Saturday, February 19, 2011

Chocolate Mousse, Six Different Types

Mousses are basically a base + setting element + cream type of dessert. Probably the most popular is a chocolate mousse and here is six different ways of making chocolate mousse.


Simple Mousse
500 g Cream
250 g Dark chocolate*
*if you want to use milk chocolate or white chocolate increase to 275g.


MOP: Melt chocolate over a double boiler. While this is heating up whip cream in mixer on high speed to a low peak or milkshake stage. Whisk the chocolate into the cream, fold to incorporate. The mousse will be stiff enough so you can pipe it into souffle cups for presentation.


Taste: The simple mousse was exactly that. It did not have any complexity of flavour or texture to it. I think that because it is so easy and fast to make that this mousse does have benefits and might be a good choice if you are going to be using it as a filling for an elaborately rich dessert which can help mask the simple taste of this mousse.




Chocolate Mousse 1*: yields 2# 12 oz.
16 oz. (100%)  Dark chocolate
9 oz. (56%)  Butter
5 oz. (31%)  Egg yolks
12 oz. (75%)  Egg whites
2.5 oz. (16%)  Sugar
*This formula is from Gisslen, Professional Baking, Ed. 5, pg. 276


MOP: Melt chocolate over a double boiler. Remove from heat and add butter, stir until butter is fully mixed in. Add egg yolks in one at a time, mixing to incorporate with each addition. In mixer whisk egg whites until foamy, add sugar in a whip to a stiff peak. Fold egg whites into chocolate mixture. Pour mousse into souffle cups, chill before serving.


Taste: This mousse had a very light, airy, and a little bit grainy taste to it. Did not have a complex taste but did have a lightness to it that tasted of a more quality mousse.




Chocolate Mousse 2*: yields 1# 4 oz.
1.5 oz. (25%)  Egg yolks
1.33 oz. (22%)  Fine granulated sugar
1 oz. (19%)  Water
6 oz. (100%)  Dark chocolate, 58%, melted
11 oz. (190%)  Heavy cream
*This formula is from Gisslen, Professional Baking, Ed. 5, pg. 277


MOP: Whip heavy cream to a soft peak, milkshake stage, set in refrigerator until you are ready to use. In your mixer whisk the egg yolks until pale. In a saucepan make a syrup with the sugar and water, boil to a soft ball stage (240°F). Slowly pour the syrup into the egg yolks and continue whisking until cool. By hand, fold the melted chocolate into the egg mixture fully incorporate. Temper the whipped cream into the egg and chocolate mixture, in thirds, fold to fully incorporate. Pour mousse into souffle cups, chill before serving.


Taste: This was richer than the simple mousse but still didn't't leave a lingering taste in the mouth. I think a mousse is a dessert that fits into the same taste category as wines and whiskies; you want to be wowed with a complex lingering taste on your palate.




Chocolate Mousse 3*: yields 1# 15 oz. 
10 oz.  Bittersweet chocolate
2.5 oz.  Water
3 oz.  Egg yolk (9 yolks)
4.5 oz.  Egg whites (9 whites)
2 oz.  Sugar
8 oz.  Heavy cream
*This formula is adapted from Gisslen, Professional Baking, Ed. 5, pg. 545


MOP: In a saucepan melt chocolate and water over low heat to 140°F, or until mixture is smooth. Beat in egg yolks and continue whisking until mixture thickens slightly. Remove mixture from heat and cool completely. Whip heavy cream to soft peak or milkshake stage, chill until ready to use. Using mixer whisk egg whites and sugar to stiff peaks. Fold the egg whites into cooled chocolate mixture. Fold whipped cream into chocolate mixture. Pour mousse into souffle cups, chill before serving.


Taste: This mousse had a deeper richer mousse taste, more like the quality you are used to getting with a super market mousse. This is probably due to the addition of egg whites to the egg yolks used in the previous recipe. When you add more ingredients to a mousse you can definitely taste the additional ingredients.




Chocolate Mousse 4*: yields 2# 12 oz.
16 oz.  Bittersweet chocolate (64%)
4 oz.  Butter
6 oz.  Egg yolks
8 oz.  Egg whites
2.5 oz.  Sugar
8 oz.  Heavy cream

*This formula is adapted from Gisslen, Professional Baking, Ed. 5, pg. 546

MOP: In a saucepan melt chocolate. Remove chocolate from heat and add butter in, stir until melted. Beat in egg yolks and continue whisking until mixture is incorporated. Set aside and let cool. Whip heavy cream to soft peak or milkshake stage, chill until ready to use. Using mixer whisk egg whites and sugar to stiff peaks. Fold the egg whites into cooled chocolate mixture. Fold whipped cream into chocolate mixture. Pour mousse into souffle cups, chill before serving.

Taste: This mousse tasted pretty much the same as mousse 3. The butter didn't add much of a complexity to the taste at all. But honestly I don't remember the taste of this mousse much.



Chocolate Mousse 5 (with gelatin)*: yields 2#  3 oz.
6g  Gelatin
50g  Sugar
50g  Water
10g  Glucose
80g  Egg yolks (4 yolks)
225g  Dark chocolate couverture, melted
500g  Heavy cream
         (100g sugar, 25g water, 50g egg whites)

*This formula is adapted from Gisslen, Professional Baking, Ed. 5, pg. 546
** Italian Meringue formula is on pg. 267. Technique is described in the link above.

MOP: Soften, or bloom gelatin in cold water. Whip heavy cream to soft peak, or milkshake stage and set aside in refrigerator to set up. Melt chocolate over a double broiler, set aside. Make Italian meringue, set aside.
In saucepan combine sugar, water, glucose and bring to a boil. While this is boiling whisk your egg yolks until thick and turns to a pale yellow colour. Slowly pour the syrup into the egg yolks, continue whisking until the mixture cools down. Fold melted chocolate into egg yolk-sugar mixture. Fold in whipped cream, incorporate both mixtures. Fold in Italian meringue, fully incorporate mixtures. Pour into molds and chill mousse until set.

Taste: This mousse was by far the superior mousse. The extra steps really did make the taste more complex, you tasted the cooked chocolate, you tasted the light meringue, you tasted the cream, and the best part was tasting them all together and also having them separate depending on what part of your palate the mousse landed on. The only thing was this mousse was a little strong for me. But definitely a mousse that could be served as a showcase product instead of a filling to a cake.

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